Sexting Prevention Information

What is sexting?

Sexting is the act of sending sexually explicit messages or photos electronically, primarily between cell phones. This activity is frequently a “courtship ritual” behavior but can also been seen in the context of an abusive relationship. Sexting can also evolve into cyber bullying when the photo is distributed with the intent to damage the reputation of the victim.

Indianola Community School District students are prohibited from sending or posting electronic messages that are abusive, obscene, sexually oriented, threatening, harassing, damaging to another’s reputation, or illegal. This prohibition applies to conduct off school property.   Any person taking, disseminating, transferring, or sharing obscene, sexually oriented, lewd, or otherwise illegal images or photographs will be disciplined according to school policy and may be reported to law enforcement.

Did you know that:

  1. Teenage girls have a few reasons for why they participate in sexting: 40 percent do it as a joke, 34 percent do it to feel sexy, and 12 percent feel pressured to do it.
  2. Who will see your sext? 17% of sexters share the messages they receive with others, and 55% of those share them with more than one person.
  3. While nearly 70% of teen boys and girls who sext do so with their girlfriend or boyfriend, 61% of all sexters who have sent nude images admit that they were pressured to do it at least once.
  4. Nearly 40% of all teenagers have posted or sent sexually suggestive messages, but this practice is more common among boys than girls.
  5. Sending semi-nude or nude photos is more common among teens girls. 22% of teen girls report sending images of this nature, while only 18% of same-age boys have.
  1. 15% of teens who have sent or posted nude/semi-nude images of themselves send these messages to people they have never met, but know from the Internet.
  2. Sending or receiving a sexually suggestive text or image under the age of 18 is considered child pornography and can result in criminal charges.
  3. 24% of high-school age teens (ages 14 to 17) and 33% of college-age students (ages 18 to 24) have been involved in a form of nude sexting.
  4. Sexting is defined by the U.S. court system as “an act of sending sexually explicit materials through mobile phones.” The messages may be text, photo, or video.
  5. In the U.S., 8 states have enacted bills to protect minors from sexting, and an additional 13 states have proposed bills to legislation.
  6. 11% of teen girls ages 13 to 16 have been involved with sending or receiving sexually explicit messages.

 

Sources

  • The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. “Teenage Sexting Statistics.” GuardChild. Accessed April 14, 2014. .
  • 2 The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. “Teenage Sexting Statistics.” GuardChild. Accessed April 14, 2014. .
  • 3 The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. “Teenage Sexting Statistics.” GuardChild. Accessed April 14, 2014. http://www.guardchild.com/teenage-sexting-statistics/>.
  • 4 The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. “Teenage Sexting Statistics.” GuardChild. Accessed April 14, 2014. .
  • 5 The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. “Teenage Sexting Statistics.” April 14, 2014. GuardChild. http://www.guardchild.com/teenage-sexting-statistics/>.
  • 6 The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. “Teenage Sexting Statistics.” GuardChild. Accessed April 14, 2014. .
  • 7 Bowker, M.A., Art, and Michael Sullivan, J.D. “Sexting: Risky Actions and Overreactions.” FBI. Accessed April 14, 2014. .
  • 8 Hudson, Heather K.. “Factors Affecting Sexting Behaviors Among Selected Undergraduate Students.” College of Education and Human Services, Southern Illinois University. Accessed April 14, 2014. .
  • 9 Dictionary.com, LLC. “Sexting.” Dictionary.com. Accessed April 14, 2014. .
  • 10 National Conference of State Legislatures. “2012 Sexting Legislation.” Sexting Legislation 2012. Accessed April 15, 2014. .
  • 11 National Institute of Justice. “Much Ado About Sexting.” National Criminal Justice Reference Service. Accessed April 15, 2015.